Environmental stewardship.

Environmental stewardship refers to responsible use and protection of the natural environment through conservation and sustainable practices. Aldo Leopold (1887–1949) championed environmental stewardship based on a land ethic "dealing with man's relation to land and to the animals and plants which grow upon it.

Different types of environmental stewards

There are 3 types of environmental stewards: doers, donors, and practitioners. Doers go out and help the cause by taking action. For example, the doers in an oil spill would be the volunteers that go along the beach and help clean up the oil from the beaches. A donor is the person that financially helps the cause. They can do anything from donating their money, to having galas or other fundraisers. They are typically governmental agencies. Lastly there are practitioners. They work on a day-to-day basis to steer governmental agencies, scientists, stakeholder groups, or any other group toward a stewardship outcome. Together these 3 groups make up environmental stewards and with the help keep the ecosystem running healthily. Anybody can be an environmental steward by being aware and knowledgeable of the world around them and making sure they do as little as possible to negatively impact our world. Without these groups it would be hard to get any sort of sustainability in our increasingly technology, pollution, industrial based world.

We build farms in New York City! Through our hard work and your generous support, Adopt-A-Farmbox donates farm boxes made from 100% recycled materials to local schools and community organizations that will spur urban farming projects across New York City.

Along with our farm boxes, schools and organizations will have the essential resources needed to implement a hands-on educational program on food, nutrition, health, and the environment. We provide everything needed to create and sustain an Adopt-a-Farmbox project:

  • Farm boxes
  • Organic soil
  • Organic Seeds
  • Consultation on seed placement optimization, soil composition, vegetable & fruit varieties
  • Plan layouts
  • Educational program integration including nutrition & cooking classes
  • Standard based curriculum for schools

Food Justice -n – a community’s ownership of  fresh, nutritious, affordable, culturally appropriate, and locally grown food.

Adopt-A-Farmbox is a solution-based initiative. Our goal is to empower people through food. We use farm boxes to create opportunities for people to reconnect with food, particularly people in communities with limited access to fresh foods.  Many communities in New York City are starving for wider and healthier food options beyond the meager selections available at fast-food chains and corner stores that permeate them. A recent study estimates that approximately three million New Yorkers live in neighborhoods with limited access to fresh foods leaving these residents vulnerable to obesity, diabetes, and heart disease. The best way to help families and communities to break the cycle of diabetes and obesity is to expose them to healthier food options and to engage them in the process from seed to fork. It creates a sense of pride and ownership while de-mystifying the concept of healthy, wholesome food.

Farmbox: -n- a plot of soil enclosed by 100% recycled wood used for the purpose of growing food.

The Adopt-A-Farmbox initiative is a program that builds and donates farm boxes made from 100 % recycled materials to local schools and community institutions for the purpose of growing fruits. This is a call to reconnect with food; to create, to prosper, and to flourish through sustainable agriculture.

We strive to engage with schools, community organizations, and institutions with a commitment to utilizing the farm boxes as fertile ground for food production and as a tool for personal growth, and community engagement. It is essential that the farm boxes be fully woven into the fabric of the organization and its surrounding community. In the map below, you can see the schools and organizations who are currently collaborating with us.

Outdoors Alliance for Kids

22 May 2019

Ecology Center

22 May 2019

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David Suzuki Foundation

22 May 2019

Cornwall Alliance

22 May 2019

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